WHO warns of increased pervasiveness of acute hepatitis among children
Category: #healthcare  By Mateen Dalal  Date: 2022-04-25
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WHO warns of increased pervasiveness of acute hepatitis among children

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently issued a warning that at least one child death has been recorded from the reported cases of acute hepatitis – inflammation of the liver, of an unknown origin found in children, with 169 cases observed so far in 12 countries.

The global health agency has issued the figures as authorities around the world are found to have been investigating the mysterious rise in cases of acute hepatitis.

The WHO has cited that a common cold virus known as adenovirus had been identified in at least 74 cases of which 20 cases were found infected with COVID-19 upon testing. At least 19 of the diagnosed patients were identified as co-infection of both adenovirus and COVID-19 virus.

The U.K., the U.S., Denmark, Netherlands, Ireland, Italy, France, Belgium, Norway, Romania, Israel, and Spain are some of the countries affected by acute cases of hepatitis of unknown origin, with 114 incidences out of 169 reported in the United Kingdom itself.

The cases occurred in children aged 1 month to 16 years, of which around 17 required liver transplantation. Moreover, no details were shared regarding the death rate or where the issue transpired. The WHO recently stated that it is working closely with British health authorities, other member states, and partners in closely monitoring the overall situation.

It is worth noting that the U.S. health officials have already sent out countrywide alerts warning doctors to be on the lookout for symptoms of pediatric hepatitis linked with a cold virus. It is undertaking a detailed investigation into unexplained cases of severe inflammation of the liver among young children.

In other developments, the WHO claimed that 627,000 people have died of malaria in 2020, which was a 12% increase from 2019. However, in 2021, WHO recommended the use of the world’s first malaria vaccine for children after evaluating the results of a pilot program run in Kenya, Ghana, and Malawi.

Source Credit:

https://health.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/diagnostics/who-says-at-least-one-child-has-died-after-increase-of-acute-hepatitis-cases-in-children/91048533

About Author

Mateen Dalal    

Mateen Dalal

Despite working as a professional testing engineer, Mateen Dalal always held a liking for content creation. Following his passion, he now pens down articles for itresearchbrief.com and a couple of similar portals. Mateen is a qualified electronics and telecommunicat...

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